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OCD app

Can changing the way you think help you cope with OCD?

It is now well documented that negative thinking habits affect people’s ability to deal with mental challenges. Multiple studies in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy show that OCD symptoms can improve by working on appraisals and adaptive thinking.

However, it is sometimes unclear what is the cause and what’s the effect: does OCD fuel negative thinking? or does negative thinking fuel OCD?

Common belief looks at OCD as some kind of an entity with its own mind. Trying to battle and control this entity is tiring and often fruitless.

One approach Cognitive Behavioral Therapy suggests is to look at OCD from a different angle – by dividing the cognitive process to two: controllable and uncontrollable thoughts.

When dealing with OCD, we can have all kinds of thoughts – some disturbing or annoying. One useful approach is letting these uncontrollable thoughts go by, without trying to control or change them.

There are two parts to this approach though: following these uncontrollable thoughts, we can have additional thoughts – that continue and build upon the negative story and strengthen it. These thoughts are actually something that we can control.

To give an example: I had a disturbing thought about me doing something bad. This thought was uncontrollable. I’d better just let is go and forget all about it.

Immediately after it, pop additional thoughts: maybe I’m a bad person? What if I did something bad? These thoughts seem as a logical progression from the original uncontrollable thought, but they are actually part of the story I’m telling myself.

So how do I avoid getting into the story?

Here we can use another technique. We give the story a name. Let’s name this story – “The story of me thinking disturbing thoughts and getting freaked out about being a bad person”. From now on, when I will have these thoughts, I will ask myself – “Do I want to tell myself the story of me thinking disturbing thoughts and getting freaked out about being a bad person?”

Is the answer yes? then maybe I do actually want to get into this story. But I have to now know that this was my choice. It is not some kind of external or uncontrollable entity that caused me to get into the story. It was me!

Is the answer no? Great, let’s try to not get into this story then. This was just a thought, and while it was disturbing and hard taking it in, I can cope with it.

Obviously, these are just suggestions. There are many techniques. For example, by using our OCD app, we can learn to let go of negative thoughts, and offer alternative, more adaptive thoughts that can come instead and replace the negative thoughts.

The main conclusion? Focus on the controllable, and make your new year helpful and supportive.

Categories
OCD app

OCD test: to check or not to check?

People who deal with OCD can often feel the urge to check. Constant checking can become a ritual.

Checking comes in many forms: making sure the door is locked, checking body temperature, monitoring relationships and checking to see if harm was done to self or others.

Due to the nature of constant checking, people who are diagnosed with OCD are advised to resist the urge to check. However, when treating OCD with CBT, or when self-managing OCD with a CBT based app, users are sometimes asked to take a self assessment that “tests their OCD” – in other words, take an OCD test.

The question that arises is therefore: is it advised to take the self-assessment and “check” my OCD? Or does it have the potential to negatively affect our ability to deal with OCD and improve?

Professor Guy Doron, co-founder of GGtude and the expert behind GG OCD app, says that it’s OK to take the assessment when advised by a professional psychologist. However, re-doing the OCD self assessment is unhelpful. “As a guide, just complete the assessment and go on to complete the daily exercises,” Prof. Doron adds.

Living with OCD is challenging. But thankfully, it’s also a treatable disorder and professional help can be an effective way to reduce checking and checking urges. 

Categories
OCD app

OCD Test: what it means about you?

There are thousands of daily searches with the term “OCD test”, as people go online to seek help with their condition and try to assess their situation and diagnosis.

One of the most commonly used assessment scales for OCD is Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (OCI). It breaks up obsessive compulsive disorder into 42 items, that are divided to 7 parts: Washing, Checking, Doubting, Ordering, Obsessing Hoarding, and Mental Neutralising.

OCI-R is a shorter OCD test, that uses just 18 questions instead of the original 42. There is also a newer, shorter version with just 4 questions (OCI-4).

There are various tools online that use this scale as well as others.

What your OCD test means about me?

  1. Assessments can be a good first step toward getting treatment.
  2. The score itself is just a number. It takes your subjective input and then, using data from previous research, outputs a score.
  3. A higher score means you are more likely to be suffering from OCD or related condition.
  4. This score can be used as a guide whether you should seek professional help for your condition.
  5. You can use the questions as a guide in order to better understand the condition you may be suffering from.

What your OCD test doesn’t mean about me?

  1. Getting a certain result doesn’t mean you have OCD.
  2. Seeking help is recommended if you feel distressed, regardless of the test score.
  3. Never use self-assessment tools as medical advice. Always consult with you doctor.

General information about OCD tests

  1. It’s not recommended to take tests too often. Try not to re-check your condition and focus on coping and recovery.
  2. Make sure whatever OCD test you take online, it has a privacy policy that clearly states that the information you provide is confidential.
  3. If you suffer from OCD, we strongly recommend that you seek help from a mental health professional in order to receive a proper diagnosis and support.

Feel free to try our OCD Test and see for yourself.

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