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OCD app

OCD test: to check or not to check?

People who deal with OCD can often feel the urge to check. Constant checking can become a ritual.

Checking comes in many forms: making sure the door is locked, checking body temperature, monitoring relationships and checking to see if harm was done to self or others.

Due to the nature of constant checking, people who are diagnosed with OCD are advised to resist the urge to check. However, when treating OCD with CBT, or when self-managing OCD with a CBT based app, users are sometimes asked to take a self assessment that “tests their OCD” – in other words, take an OCD test.

The question that arises is therefore: is it advised to take the self-assessment and “check” my OCD? Or does it have the potential to negatively affect our ability to deal with OCD and improve?

Professor Guy Doron, co-founder of GGtude and the expert behind GG OCD app, says that it’s OK to take the assessment when advised by a professional psychologist. However, re-doing the OCD self assessment is unhelpful. “As a guide, just complete the assessment and go on to complete the daily exercises,” Prof. Doron adds.

Living with OCD is challenging. But thankfully, it’s also a treatable disorder and professional help can be an effective way to reduce checking and checking urges. 

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OCD app

OCD Test: what it means about you?

There are thousands of daily searches with the term “OCD test”, as people go online to seek help with their condition and try to assess their situation and diagnosis.

One of the most commonly used assessment scales for OCD is Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (OCI). It breaks up obsessive compulsive disorder into 42 items, that are divided to 7 parts: Washing, Checking, Doubting, Ordering, Obsessing Hoarding, and Mental Neutralising.

OCI-R is a shorter OCD test, that uses just 18 questions instead of the original 42. There is also a newer, shorter version with just 4 questions (OCI-4).

There are various tools online that use this scale as well as others.

What your OCD test means about me?

  1. Assessments can be a good first step toward getting treatment.
  2. The score itself is just a number. It takes your subjective input and then, using data from previous research, outputs a score.
  3. A higher score means you are more likely to be suffering from OCD or related condition.
  4. This score can be used as a guide whether you should seek professional help for your condition.
  5. You can use the questions as a guide in order to better understand the condition you may be suffering from.

What your OCD test doesn’t mean about me?

  1. Getting a certain result doesn’t mean you have OCD.
  2. Seeking help is recommended if you feel distressed, regardless of the test score.
  3. Never use self-assessment tools as medical advice. Always consult with you doctor.

General information about OCD tests

  1. It’s not recommended to take tests too often. Try not to re-check your condition and focus on coping and recovery.
  2. Make sure whatever OCD test you take online, it has a privacy policy that clearly states that the information you provide is confidential.
  3. If you suffer from OCD, we strongly recommend that you seek help from a mental health professional in order to receive a proper diagnosis and support.

Feel free to try our OCD Test and see for yourself.

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OCD app

Can a mobile app help cope with OCD?

In the past, people coping with OCD who were looking for solutions had limited options. You could go see a psychiatrist, whose tools are psychotherapy and medicine. Later on, CBT (Cognitive Behavioral Therapy) introduced new protocols that proved to be effective for OCD.

Nowadays, the gold standard for OCD remains CBT therapy, however there are new tools that use this methodology remotely or digitally. More often than before, people who want to solve a problem often search for an app that solves this problem. For example, if you want to improve your physical fitness, you may use an app for that.

Apps have great potential as e-learning and training tools, because they are accessible, immediate and relatively easy to form habits with.

So, when looking for an app to help deal with OCD, what should you look for?

The 4 OCD app “must haves”

1. Evidence based

There are many products that promise the world, but not many of them are researched using academic methods and peer reviews. You want your app to have at least some sort of research backing and credibility. If possible, it should have actual on-product studies that are published in well known academic journals.

2. Beyond articles and videos

The power of apps is that they “applications” – meaning that they actually do stuff and not just serve as a browser. We are bombarded by information, but apps have the ability to transform the most relevant information into practice using daily tasks and activities.

3. Great user experience and customer support

You don’t want an app that someone uploaded to the app store ages ago but doesn’t provide support for. Search for apps that are being updated regularly, that provide with easy to use and intuitive user interface and that help you do what needs to be done as quickly and efficiently as possible.

4. Privacy minded

The last thing we want is that someone will use our private information for any purpose other than help us improve our coping with OCD. That’s why it’s important to use apps that clearly label their use of user data and their tracking policy.

Most credible mental health apps know that and respect user privacy, but it’s always a good idea to check out this information. By the way, if an app uses anonymized tracking codes to drive downloads via marketing channels, it isn’t necessarily a problem. What is important is that the data isn’t shared and no identifiable user information is being shared across apps and platforms.

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OCD test: to check or not to check?

People who deal with OCD can often feel the urge to check. Constant checking can become a ritual. Checking comes in many forms: making sure the door is locked, checking…

Continue reading

OCD Test: what it means about you?

There are thousands of daily searches with the term “OCD test”, as people go online to seek help with their condition and try to assess their situation and diagnosis. One…

Continue reading

Can a mobile app help cope with OCD?

In the past, people coping with OCD who were looking for solutions had limited options. You could go see a psychiatrist, whose tools are psychotherapy and medicine. Later on, CBT…

Continue reading

Prof. Guy Doron answers your ROCD questions

This week, GGtude co-founder and CSO Prof. Guy Doron participated as a panelist in International OCD Foundation’s special event about Relationship OCD. Join IOCDF lead advocate Chris Trondsen, MS, AMFT,…

Continue reading

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OCD app

Body dissatisfaction and resilience

How our mental wellness app reduces negative body image for high risk female university students

  • Body dissatisfaction represents a prevalent condition in young women.
  • Daily training with our mobile app may reduce some forms of body dissatisfaction.
  • Medium-large effect size reductions emerged for BDD symptoms.
  • Effects of the intervention on eating disorder symptoms seem more limited.

Body dissatisfaction is prevalent in young women and is associated with symptoms of Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) and Eating Disorders (EDs).

Prof. Guy Doron, co-founder of GGtude, together with a team of students and researchers, wanted to assess the positive effect of our mobile application, based on cognitive behavioral principles, in reducing body dissatisfaction and BDD/ED (Body Dysmorphic Disorder) symptoms in female university students, considered at high-risk of developing Body Image Disorders (BIDs). 

How the study was conducted

Fifty university students at high-risk of developing BIDs (using self-report questionnaires assessing BIDs and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-5 Clinical Version) were assigned to two random groups: an immediate-use group (iApp group; n = 25) and a delayed-use group (dApp group; n = 25). The iApp group started using the app at baseline for 16 days (T0 to T1). The dApp group waited for 16 days before starting to use the app (T1 to T2). Participants completed questionnaires at baseline (T0), 16 days from baseline (T1), and 32 days from baseline (T2).

The results

Repeated measure Analyses of Variance (ANOVAs) showed a Group interaction on BDD symptoms indicating medium effect size reductions in the iApp group compared to dApp group; post-intervention means for BDD symptoms were under the cut-off for extreme body dissatisfaction/BDD symptoms in both groups.

Conclusion

Training 3 minutes a day for 16 days with our OCD mobile app may lead to reductions in some forms of body dissatisfaction, including BDD symptoms in female university students at high-risk of developing BIDs.

What does it mean for people who suffer from body image issues?

The results show that it’s possible to reduce some forms of body dissatisfaction using the app for 16 days, 3 minutes every day.

You are welcome to try the app for free and see for yourself.

APP DOWNLOAD LINKS:

Citations

Cerea S., Ghisi, M., Bottesi, G., Manoli, E., Carraro., T., & Doron (in press). Short, Daily Cognitive behavioural Training Using a Mobile Application Reduces Body Image Related Symptoms in High Risk Female University Students: A Randomized Controlled Study. Behavior Therapy.

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OCD app

I have doubts about my relationship. Is it normal?

Doubt is a defensive mechanism. Its purpose is to warn and protect us from mistakes and danger. A good balance between confidence and doubt ensures we can operate in this world freely and happily, and maintain a healthy relationship.

However, some people find it much more common to be unsure about things that for others can be more straightforward. For example, we can get preoccupied or obsessed about our partner, spouse or loved ones. This obsessive behaviour and thinking can prevent us from seeing clearly and making the right choices. Instead of protecting us, it can damage our relationships and our well being.

How do I know if I have ROCD?

Worrying, having doubts or even being preoccupied with a particular relationship does not automatically suggest a diagnosis of a relationship obsession.

Like other OCD symptoms, relationship-related OCD symptoms require psychological intervention only when causing significant distress and are incapacitating. Assessing ROCD symptoms, however, is further complicated by the fact that such experiences, even if distressing, may still be a part of the normal course of a still developing relationship, mainly during the flirting and dating stages of a relationship, or reflect real life problems.

ROCD and the OCD app

When we developed the app, we decided to focus on beliefs as a catalyst for changing maladaptive behaviours. Beliefs are interesting: We often forget about them, but they sit there in the back of our minds and control us, making us respond in specific ways to various stimuli.

Our app is focused on helping people improve their condition whether they have normal doubts or if they suffer from Relationship OCD.

Research shows training for 3-5 minutes a day can benefit users by reducing symptoms and challenging beliefs that hinder judgement.